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Ficus pumila

Fig, Creeping

Figvine is very unlike the common edible fig (Ficus carica).  This evergreen vine has small fingernail size rounded leaves and is usually seen on masonary walls where it climbs high by means of little rootlets which hold fast to rough surfaces.  On walls it can form interesting patterns or a complete cover.  As it reaches a certain height and age it's new leaves change to a considerably larger more pointed and leathery adult foliage which is very different.  At this point it may send out short branches perpendicular to the wall and produce small inedible fig fruits.  It is native to eastern Asia but widely grown in the southern U.S.   

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Bloom Color

Figvine is very unlike the common edible fig (Ficus carica).  This evergreen vine has small fingernail size rounded leaves and is usually seen on masonary walls where it climbs high by means of little rootlets which hold fast to rough surfaces.  On walls it can form interesting patterns or a complete cover.  As it reaches a certain height and age it's leaves change to a considerably larger more pointed and leathery adult foliage which is very different.  At this point it may send out short branches perpendicular to the wall and produce small inedible fig fruits.  It is native to eastern Asia but widely grown in the southern U.S.    

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USDA Hardiness Zone 8-10

Additional Information:

Figvine is very unlike the common edible fig (Ficus carica).  This evergreen vine has small fingernail size rounded leaves and is usually seen on masonary walls where it climbs high by means of little rootlets which hold fast to rough surfaces.  On walls it can form interesting patterns or a complete cover.  As it reaches a certain height and age it's leaves change to a considerably larger more pointed and leathery adult foliage which is very different.  At this point it may send out short branches perpendicular to the wall and produce small inedible fig fruits.  It is native to eastern Asia but widely grown in the southern U.S.